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Dental Care for Your Baby
 

Q. When should my child first see a dentist?
 

A: "First visit by first birthday" sums it up. Your child should visit a pediatric dentist when the first tooth comes in, usually between 6 and 12 months of age. Infant dental appointments allow children to become acquainted with the dental office and it also allows the dentist to evaluate and detect any development problems before they become severe. It will also establish a dental home for your child. Early examination and preventive care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future.
 

Q. Why so early? What dental problems could a baby have?
 

A: The most important reason is to begin a thorough prevention program. Dental problems can begin early. A big concern is Early Childhood Caries (formerly known as baby bottle tooth decay or nursing caries). Once a child’s diet includes anything besides breast-milk, erupted teeth are at risk for decay. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental problems. Children with healthy teeth chew food easily and smile with confidence. Start your child now on a lifetime of good dental habits.
 

Q. How can I prevent tooth decay from nursing or using a bottle?
 

A: At-will breast-feeding should be avoided after the first primary (baby) teeth begin to erupt and other sources of nutrition have been introduced. Children should not fall asleep with a bottle containing anything other than water. Drinking juice from a bottle should be avoided. Fruit juice should only be offered in a cup with meals or at snack time.
 

Q. When should bottle-feeding be stopped?
 

A: Children should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age.
 

Q. Should I worry about thumb and finger sucking?
 

A: Thumb sucking is perfectly normal for infants; many stop by age 2. Prolonged thumb sucking can create crooked teeth or bite problems. If the habit continues beyond age 3, a professional evaluation is recommended. Your pediatric dentist will be glad to suggest ways to address a prolonged thumb sucking habit.
 

Q. When should I start cleaning my baby’s teeth?
 

A: The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. As soon as the teeth begin to appear, start brushing twice daily using fluoridated toothpaste and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Use a "smear" of toothpaste to brush the teeth of a child less than 2 years of age. For the 2-5 year old, dispense a "pea-size" amount of toothpaste and perform or assist your child’s tooth brushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.
 

Q. Any advice on teething?
 

A: From six months to age 3, your child may have tender gums when teeth erupt. Many children like a clean teething ring, cool spoon or cold wet washcloth. Some parents swear by a chilled ring; others simply rub the baby’s gums with a clean finger.
 

• Importance of Primary Teeth (Baby Teeth) • It is very important that primary teeth are kept in place until they are lost naturally. These teeth serve a number of critical functions.
Primary teeth: • Maintain good nutrition by permitting your child to chew properly. • Are involved in speech development. • Help the permanent teeth by saving space for them. A healthy smile can help children feel good about the way they look to others  Diet and Snacking •
 

Q: What is a healthy diet for my child?
 

A: A healthy diet is a balanced diet that naturally supplies all the nutrients your child needs to grow. A balanced diet is one that includes the following major food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, meat, beans, and milk- these are the key groups according to the food pyramid.
 

Q: How does my children’s diet affect their dental health?
 

A: They must have a balanced diet for their teeth to develop properly. They also need a balanced diet for healthy gum tissue around the teeth. Equally important, a diet high in certain kinds of carbohydrates, such as sugar and starches, may place your child at extra risk for tooth decay.
 

Q: My youngest isn't on solid foods yet. Do you have suggestions for him?
 

A: Do not nurse a young child to sleep or put him to bed with a bottle of milk, formula, juice or sweetened liquid. While a child sleeps, any un-swallowed liquid in the mouth feeds bacteria that produce acids and attack the teeth. Protect your child from severe tooth decay by putting him to bed with nothing more than a pacifier or bottle of water.

Frequently Asked Questions

Sealants
 

Q: What are sealants?
 

A: Sealants protect the grooved and pitted surfaces of the teeth, especially the chewing surfaces of back teeth where most cavities in children are found. Made of clear or shaded plastic, sealants are applied to the teeth to help keep them cavity-free.
 

Q: How do sealants work?
 

A: Even if your child brushes and flosses carefully, it is difficult—sometimes impossible—to clean the tiny grooves and pits on certain teeth. Food and bacteria build up in these crevices, placing your child in danger of tooth decay. Sealants “seal out” food and plaque, thus reducing the risk of decay.
 

Q: How long do sealants last?
 

A: Research shows that sealants can last for many years if properly cared for. Therefore, your child will be protected throughout the most cavity-prone years. If your child has good oral hygiene and avoids biting hard objects, sealants will last longer. Your pediatric dentist will check the sealants during routine dental visits and recommend re-application or repair when necessary.

Enamel Fluorisis
 

Q: What is enamel fluorosis?
 

A: A child may face the condition called enamel fluorosis if he or she gets too much fluoride during the years of tooth development. Too much fluoride can result in defects in tooth enamel.
 

Q: Why is enamel fluorosis a concern?
 

A: Most cases of fluorosis are mild and will appear as tiny white specks or streaks that are often unnoticeable. However, in severe cases of enamel fluorosis, the appearance of the teeth is marred by discoloration or brown markings. The enamel may be pitted, rough, and hard to clean.
 

Q: How does a child get enamel fluorosis?
 

A: By swallowing too much fluoride for the child's size and weight during the years of tooth development. This can happen in several different ways. First, a child may take more of a fluoride supplement than the amount prescribed. Second, the child may take a fluoride supplement when there is already an optimal amount of fluoride in the drinking water. Third, some children simply like the taste of fluoridated toothpaste. They may use too much toothpaste, then swallow it instead of spitting it out.
 

Q: Should I just avoid fluorides for my child altogether?
 

A: No! Fluoride prevents tooth decay. Fluoride is an important part in helping keep your child’s smile healthy for a lifetime. Getting enough -- but not too much -- fluoride can be easily accomplished with the help of your pediatric dentist. Watch your child's use of fluoridated toothpaste. A pea-sized amount on the brush is plenty for fluoride protection. Teach your child to spit out the toothpaste, not swallow it, after brushing.

Dental Emergencies


Q: What if my child has a toothache?
 

A: Call your pediatric dentist and visit the office promptly. To comfort your child, rinse the mouth with water. Over-the-counter children’s pain medication, dosed according to your child’s weight and age, might ease the symptoms. You may apply a cold compress or ice wrapped in a cloth to the face in the area of the pain, but do not put heat or aspirin on the sore area.

Q: What should I do if my child's baby tooth is knocked out?

A: Contact your pediatric dentist as soon as possible. The baby tooth should not be replanted because of the potential for subsequent damage to the developing permanent tooth.

Q: What should I do if my child's permanent tooth is knocked out?

A: Find the tooth and rinse it gently in cool water. (Do not scrub or clean it with soap -- use only water!) If possible, replace the tooth in the socket immediately and hold it there with clean gauze or a wash cloth. If you can’t put the tooth back in the socket, place the tooth in a clean container with cold milk, saliva or water.
 

Get to the pediatric dental office immediately. (Call the emergency number if it’s after hours.) The faster you act, the better your chances of saving the tooth.

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